September 15

Google Docs – ch 3

1st Hour – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Q5W63254a_7U2N_C3GlbEZCiBnU_xqY7nQ7SMqKsIos/edit?usp=sharing

2nd Hour – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zfUQwFX8IkIRNufJwVLCqNSOQ-S-sc-YmORlInijLRc/edit?usp=sharing

4th Hour – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1auLK9wuw007pg9vY6nsQCeOVZdHWGx92qQxvLzzNOI0/edit?usp=sharing

HERE’S THE LINK to God in America part 1 – we watched from 00:32 to 00:57.

 

Due Monday night, 9/18, at 10 pm.  

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June 16

2017 Summer Assignment

HEY APUSH, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE DO NOT PLAN ON PRINTING YOUR 2ND HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT AT SCHOOL ON TUESDAY.  THIS NEW TECH ROLL OUT IS A HOT FLAMING MESS, AND THE PRINTERS AREN’T WORKING FOR US.  

PLEASE PRINT AT HOME OR EMAIL IT TO ME.  

 

Here is the Google Doc with all of the instructions for completing the summer work.

1st half is due by August 1.   (if you have camp, travel, etc., let me know ahead of time if you can’t get it done by August 1).

2nd half is due the day you get back to school, Sept. 5

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1eLFWkxN7aVKzFdlrbg-rvZqwEwm6jx9MMv0oXq-jzfQ/edit?usp=sharing

 

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June 11

Blog #100 – Final Reflection

This blog is part of your final exam (20%), so please take some time and think about your answers.

400 words minimum for your total response.  Please number your answers in the comment section.

1. A lot of our time this year has been spent reading, writing, studying, watching videos, reflecting, and talking about American history.  Discuss what your favorite learning style was this year and why it was effective for you.  Also, explain which was your least favorite way to learn and explain why it doesn’t work for you.

2. We studied a lot of stuff this year – from the Pilgrims to the Revolution to Andrew Jackson (soon to be leaving the $20) to Abe Lincoln to Alice Paul to the Yippies to the Great Recession and beyond.  What did you wish we had spent more time on than we did this year and why?

3. Yep, we studied a whole lot of stuff this year, but I bet you wish there were some units that were shorter or didn’t go as in depth.  What did you wish we had studied less of and explain why (keep in mind that if the info didn’t make it onto the test doesn’t mean it won’t be there next year)?

4. What were your strengths and weaknesses as a student?  Explain with some specific examples.

5. People talk a lot about takeaways – a summary of an experience, distilled down to one or two sentences.  What is your takeaway from APUSH (or in other words, what did you truly learn about American history)?

I will truly miss you guys and gals.  I think a lot of what has made me enjoy this year is seeing you grow as a person and as a student.  I’ve had the privilege of watching you become history nerds along with me this year (or not hate history as much, I hope!).  We’ve been able to geek out about Hamilton, the Era of Good Feelings, the Cold War, and many other things.  I hope that you had as much fun learning in APUSH as I did teaching, because I loved working with all of you.  I also hope that you get great news about your APUSH exam on July 5 (and the SAT subject area exam if you took that too).

Due before your final exam class (2nd hour – Wed., 3rd Hour  – Thurs., 5th Hour – Fri). 

June 6

Book Assignment #4

Due Thursday, June 8 by 10 p.m.  500 words minimum.  

Please include the title of your book in your response.  

a. Summarize your reading for that part; also, this might be the part to examine bias in the book w/ specific examples.

b. Connect a historical thinking skill to your book segment – contextualization, comparison, change and continuity over time, synthesis, cause and effects, periodization (including turning points).

c. Connect your reading to something we’ve studied in APUSH.

d. Give the book a grade – A, B, C, D, F – and a recommendation to keep the book for next year or ditch it and why).  Use specific examples from the book.  Also, complete your Aurasma 1 minute book review.

Happy reading! 

June 6

Blog #99 – When was America great?

Our current president campaigned on the slogan, Make America Great Again.  It made me wonder, as an amatuer historian, what time period do you think he meant that America should go back to?  So, I ask you, as competent, well-versed APUSH students who have studied almost all of American history, when was America great?

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If you’re like me, you may have a hard time narrowing it down to one specific time period.  I’m thinking of several, but I won’t reveal my answers until you guys are done w/ this blog.

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Please answer the following questions: 

  1. Give me a time period when you think America was great.  It doesn’t have to be the latest, or the best, but one in which you think America lived up to its highest ideals and values.  Explain why you think this event or time period makes America great.
  2. Since the president doesn’t think we’re great now, why do you think we are not great now (in essence, what made America not great)?  Or, if you disagree with the president, why is America great now?  Explain with specific examples.
  3. What time period do you think the president wants to go back to and why?

Due Thursday, June 8 by class.  350 words minimum.  

June 1

Book Assignment #3

Due Thursday, June 1 by 10 p.m.  500 words minimum.  

Please include the title of your book in your response.  

a. Summarize your reading for that part; also, this might be the part to examine bias in the book w/ specific examples.

b. Connect a historical thinking skill to your book segment – contextualization, comparison, change and continuity over time, synthesis, cause and effects, periodization (including turning points).

c. Connect your reading to something we’ve studied in APUSH.

d. Make predictions as to where your story will go (even if you’re reading a biography or history and you know where the story is going, try to anticipate some things like trends or themes that you may have encountered in the book that you may not have anticipated or known).  This would also be where you can examine your connection (or lack thereof) to the characters or events.

Happy reading! 

May 30

Blog #98 – Media Images for Women and Toxic Masculinity

So, we watched Tough Guise 2, a searing film on our toxic masculinity culture, and Killing Us Softly 4, a strong indictment about advertising’s impact on women and girls’ bodies and self-esteem.

Tough Guise 2 doesn’t say that every man is violent, acts as gender police, or strikes a cool pose modeled after black urban images.  But it does talk about the epidemic of violence that is conducted by men (77% – 99% of aggravated assault, armed robbery, murder, domestic violence, and rape), and discusses how men are the victims of this violence.  Fathers and older males can perpetuate the tough persona by trying to make us tougher or not show emotions in public in order to avoid feeling shame.  Men of color are stuck in media stereotypes as well (whether it’s Bruce Lee, Latinos, or Native Americans).  One of the things that the film stated was that this latest emphasis on masculinity was that it’s a sign of a culture in retreat, that white males are experiencing more and more economic insecurity and becoming the victims of a p.c. culture and expanding rights for women, people of color, and LGBTQ folks.  This kind of explains the spread of “bum fights” and attacks on gay people, but not completely.  What is needed, according to the film maker, Jackson Katz, is a less narrow definition of masculinity, one that includes women (see Jack Myers’ article), and also shows a multi-varied and accurate representations of men in media.

 

Killing Us Softly 4 examines the way media and advertising influence women and girls and normalize what is desirable and accepted (thin, white, blond) even in other countries.   What these images do is promote the idea that women and girls must live up to a flawless image, one that can be assembled by computers or trimmed to fit the ideal if the real woman doesn’t measure up.  Some of these messages that media and advertising send is that women must be submissive, passive, and silent, and effortlessly perfect.  There’s also a huge emphasis on young people having sex, some ads bordering on pornographic.  Also, there’s the increasing sexualization of younger girls (see articles below).  With an increased exposure to these messages, girls are prone to eating disorders, depression, and low self-esteem.  This has become a public health problem that needs to be solved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your questions:

  1. How do the two films crossover with their subject matter? Explain.
  2. How do both films focus on their issues as public health problems?
  3. Provide an explanation for at least one takeaway from each film.

Your blog comment should be at least 350 words total by Wednesday, May 31 by class. 

 

Sources: 

Author Jack Myers on Masculinity crisis in TIME, 2016 – http://time.com/4339209/masculinity-crisis/

National Review‘s look at men dropping out of the workforce – http://www.nationalreview.com/article/440849/male-labor-force-participation-rate-drop-about-masculine-identity

The American Psychological Association’s report on the Sexualization of Girls – http://www.apa.org/pi/women/programs/girls/report.aspx

The Oversexualization of Young Girls – https://girlsgonewise.com/the-over-sexualization-of-little-girls/

What’s Wrong with the Media’s Portrayal of Women Today, and How to Reverse It – https://www.forbes.com/sites/kathycaprino/2014/11/21/whats-wrong-with-the-medias-portrayal-of-women-today-and-how-to-reverse-it/#1ad6585f44c2

May 24

Book Assignment #2

Due Friday, May 26 by 10 p.m.  500 words minimum.  

Please include the title of your book in your response.  

a. Summarize your reading for that part; also, this might be the part to examine bias in the book w/ specific examples.

b. Connect a historical thinking skill to your book segment – contextualization, comparison, change and continuity over time, synthesis, cause and effects, periodization (including turning points).

c. Connect your reading to something we’ve studied in APUSH.

d. Make predictions as to where your story will go (even if you’re reading a biography or history and you know where the story is going, try to anticipate some things like trends or themes that you may have encountered in the book that you may not have anticipated or known).  This would also be where you can examine your connection (or lack thereof) to the characters or events.

Happy reading!